A Devotion for the Eighth Week after Trinity

A Devotion for the Eighth Week after Trinity

The following devotion comes from God Grant It, a book of daily devotions from C. F. W. Walther intended to encourage laity, as well as pastors, and affirm them in their daily lives as redeemed children of God. The Eighth Week after Trinity Monday Read Matthew 7:16–23 With the words of today’s reading, Christ appears(…)

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Announcing the Release of On the Law (Johann Gerhard)

Announcing the Release of On the Law (Johann Gerhard)

On the Law, the newest volume in the translation of Johann Gerhard’s Theological Commonplaces, is now available. In this volume, Gerhard addresses the moral Law of God, revealed in Scripture and nature, as well as all other kinds of laws, such as the ceremonies and civil laws of the Old Testament. Here the reader finds a(…)

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Everything you wanted to know about the New Testament but were afraid to ask

Everything you wanted to know about the New Testament but were afraid to ask

Decades of providing pastoral care and university teaching have given Rev. Dr. Michael Eschelbach ample opportunity to answer countless biblical questions. Why are the Gospel accounts different? Why does the Bible spend so much time listing genealogies? What does Revelation mean? Dr. Eschelbach offers answers to these questions (and many more) in The Big Book(…)

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God’s Design For Marriage

God’s Design For Marriage

When Jesus was asked about marriage and divorce, he referred back to the account of God’s original creation of the first man and woman, and to God’s provision that in marriage the two become one flesh (Genesis 2:7, 18–24). Since “they are no longer two, but one flesh,” Jesus declares, “What God has joined together,(…)

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An Excerpt from the Newest Theological Commonplaces Volume

An Excerpt from the Newest Theological Commonplaces Volume

Johann Gerhard (1582–1637) is considered by many as the third preeminent theologian of the Lutheran Reformation, following Martin Luther and Martin Chemnitz. In his magisterial Theological Commonplaces, he systematically, skillfully, and precisely presents the doctrines of the Christian faith, arguing against the positions of Roman Catholics (as represented by Robert Bellarmine) and the Reformed (as represented(…)

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Why Should You Read “Church Fellowship”?

Why Should You Read “Church Fellowship”?

“President Walther was a valuable teacher for the LCMS in his day; he is just as valuable for the LCMS today and tomorrow. Any group of pastors and laymen will learn much from this anthology of his articles and speeches, which has never before been collected into one volume. Walther gives me more confidence to(…)

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Whatever Happened to the Gospel?

Whatever Happened to the Gospel?

CPH recently released the second edition of Craig Parton’s The Defense Never Rests, a powerful critique of American Christianity that provides a defense of the pure Gospel. The new edition features sections dealing with the challenges of New Atheism, Bart Ehrman, and the new wave of biblical criticism. The following excerpt is from the book’s introduction.

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Q & A with Dr. Scott Ashmon, Part 3

Q & A with Dr. Scott Ashmon, Part 3

The conclusion of our three-part Q & A with Dr. Scott Ashmon, editor of The Idea and Practice of a Christian University, follows below. You can read part 1 here and part 2 here.

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Romans: A Contextual Letter with Universal Application

Romans: A Contextual Letter with Universal Application

In commemoration of St. Peter and St. Paul today, we are posting an excerpt from Michael Middendorf’s commentary on St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans. Romans 1–8 articulates the meaning of the Greek text of Romans in its original context for the benefit of the church and world today. Though a theologically thorough and high(…)

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Commemoration of the Presentation of the Augsburg Confession

Commemoration of the Presentation of the Augsburg Confession

The presentation of the Augsburg Confession was a decisive moment, one long in coming. It is important to understand the history leading up to the Imperial Meeting at Augsburg [on June 25, 1530]. Nine years earlier, on April 18, 1521, at the Imperial Meeting in Worms, Charles V had listened as Martin Luther refused to(…)

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