Preview the Next Volume of Luther’s Works!

Preview the Next Volume of Luther’s Works!

In his role as a professor of Old Testament, Luther never lectured or composed a full commentary on Matthew. He preached on it regularly, however, not only from the traditional lectionary texts for the church year but especially in a series of fifty-six sermons on Matthew 18–24 (LW 67–68), which he preached to the people(…)

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A Devotion from Treasury of Daily Prayer

A Devotion from Treasury of Daily Prayer

Organized around the Christian Church Year, Treasury of Daily Prayer is designed to be an all-in-one resource that cultivates an enriching devotional life for individuals, families, and small groups. The following excerpt, for the commemoration of Ezekiel (July 21), is indicative of the way in which Treasury of Daily Prayer unites Scripture readings, prayers, psalms, hymns, and devotional(…)

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An Excerpt from Letters to Lutheran Pastors

An Excerpt from Letters to Lutheran Pastors

German theologian Hermann Sasse (1895–1976) was trained at the University of Berlin but became a convinced confessional Lutheran after discovering the writings of Wilhelm Löhe while studying in the United States. His professional career at the University of Erlangen was forever marked by Hitler and the Nazis. Sasse was a vocal opponent of the Third(…)

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Prophets and Historians

Prophets and Historians

The following is an excerpt from Lutheran Bible Companion, available this Fall. The LBC, a two-volume set, covers every canonical book of the Bible, including the Apocrypha. This selection is from the “The Books of History.”   Prophets and Historians It is not entirely clear how or why Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings came to be called(…)

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An Excerpt from Christian Freedom

An Excerpt from Christian Freedom

Citizens of the United States have just concluded another observance of Independence Day, a commemoration of our independence from England and an opportunity to celebrate the freedoms we enjoy as Americans. But what does it mean to have freedom as a Christian? Martin Luther’s Christian Freedom shows us that we find real freedom only in(…)

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An Excerpt from Walther’s Hymnal to Commemorate the Visitation of Mary

An Excerpt from Walther’s Hymnal to Commemorate the Visitation of Mary

Throughout the formative years of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod and well into the early twentieth-century, congregations throughout America used a German hymnal edited by C.F.W. Walther. In Walther’s Hymnal, Matthew Carver, a translator of German and classical literature, presents for the first time in English the hymns and liturgical texts that our grandparents sang and(…)

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Coming Soon! Gerhard’s On Sin and Free Choice

Coming Soon! Gerhard’s On Sin and Free Choice

Johann Gerhard (1582–1637) is considered by many as the third preeminent theologian of the Lutheran Reformation, following Martin Luther and Martin Chemnitz. In his magisterial Theological Commonplaces, he systematically, skillfully, and precisely presents the doctrines of the Christian faith, arguing against the positions of Roman Catholics (as represented by Robert Bellarmine) and the Reformed (as(…)

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True vs. False Prophecy

True vs. False Prophecy

The following is an excerpt from Lutheran Bible Companion, available this Fall. The LBC, a two-volume set, covers every canonical book of the Bible, including the Apocrypha. This selection is from the “The Books of Prophets,” a section examining the Bible’s understanding of prophecy along with the classic critical views. True Versus False Prophecy How(…)

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An Excerpt from Commentary on Luther’s Catechisms: Lord’s Prayer

An Excerpt from Commentary on Luther’s Catechisms: Lord’s Prayer

For Martin Luther, God’s action in creation, redemption, sanctification, justification, and prayer are inseparably tied together, and all true prayer finds the seed around which it can crystallize in the Lord’s Prayer. Albrecht Peters’ Commentary on Luther’s Catechisms: Lord’s Prayer shows the development of Luther’s thoughts on the Lord’s Prayer and provides the needed context(…)

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Katie Luther: Mother of the Reformation

Katie Luther: Mother of the Reformation

Originally published in German in 1906, The Mother of the Reformation presents a compelling portrait for those desiring to know more about this quietly influential Reformation character. Mark DeGarmeaux brings the warmth of Kroker’s writing to a new generation of those interested in the Reformation and especially Katie, the woman behind the hammer. The excerpt(…)

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