Systematic Theology and Apologetics

First Look: Confessing the Gospel: A Lutheran Approach to Systematic Theology

First Look: Confessing the Gospel: A Lutheran Approach to Systematic Theology

Confessing the Gospel: A Lutheran Approach to Systematic Theology is a new, two-volume dogmatics that is the culmination of a decades-long project that began in the 1980s. It has been almost a century since the Missouri Synod last published a new dogmatics, the most recent being Francis Pieper’s three-volume Christliche Dogmatik, which was published between(…)

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Why Should I Trust the Bible?

<i>Why Should I Trust the Bible?</i>

You or people you know have likely had tough questions about the Bible at some point or another. Maybe you’ve even heard things like, “The Bible is racist.” Or, “The Bible has too many errors and edits.” Or, “The Bible is merely a mythological story like Homer’s Odyssey.” Author Trevor Sutton’s newest book Why Should(…)

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New from Johann Gerhard: On the Gospel and Repentance

New from Johann Gerhard: <i>On the Gospel and Repentance</i>

The newest release in the Theological Commonplaces of Johann Gerhard presents two commonplaces. On the Gospel defines the Gospel carefully as the proclamation of God’s promises and forgiveness of sins for the sake of Jesus Christ. Since confusions continually arise on the relationship of the Gospel to the text of the New Testament, Old Testament, and(…)

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Giving All Glory to God

Giving All Glory to God

The newest volume in the Walther’s Works Series, All Glory to God, contains the final, mature systematic theology of C. F. W. Walther, first president of the LCMS. In no other work did Walther set forth his own theology as comprehensively as he did here. The following excerpt of All Glory to God comes from(…)

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Whatever Happened to the Gospel?

Whatever Happened to the Gospel?

CPH recently released the second edition of Craig Parton’s The Defense Never Rests, a powerful critique of American Christianity that provides a defense of the pure Gospel. The new edition features sections dealing with the challenges of New Atheism, Bart Ehrman, and the new wave of biblical criticism. The following excerpt is from the book’s introduction.

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What Does the Resurrection Mean?

What Does the Resurrection Mean?

He is risen! In celebration of this joyous occasion, we’re posting an excerpt from Craig Parton’s chapter in Making the Case for Christianity in which he investigates the facts and evidence surrounding the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Accessible to readers of all levels, Making the Case for Christianity: Responding to Modern Objections introduces specific intellectual objections to(…)

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Commemorating Philip Melanchthon

Commemorating Philip Melanchthon

Today we commemorate the birth of Philip Melanchthon (born on February 16 in 1497)—author, humanist, reformer, theologian, and educator.  In 1521, Melanchthon published the Loci Communes, of which Martin Luther once said: “Philip Melanchthon’s invincible little book on Loci Theologici in my judgment is worthy not only of immortality but even of the Church’s canon.”(…)

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Did Christianity Turn the World Upside Down?

Did Christianity Turn the World Upside Down?

If you’re in the St. Louis area, join Dr. Alvin J. Schmidt, author of The American Muhammad (St. Louis: Concordia, 2013), as he presents a lecture entitled “Christianity Once Turned the World Upside Down: Is It Still True?” on February 7. The lecture is free to the public and will take place at Village Lutheran(…)

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Melanchthon’s Commonplaces and the Translating Process: An Interview with Dr. Christian Preus

Melanchthon’s Commonplaces and the Translating Process: An Interview with Dr. Christian Preus

In his first project for Concordia Publishing House, Dr. Christian Preus took on the translation of the 1521 edition of Philipp Melanchthon’s Loci Communes, published under the title Commonplaces: Loci Communes 1521. The following interview introduces this essential theological text, its author, and its translator.

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Praise for Melanchthon’s 1521 Commonplaces

Praise for Melanchthon’s 1521 Commonplaces

Martin Luther called Philip Melanchthon’s most important work, Commonplaces: Loci Communes 1521, worthy of immortality. This lively, accessible English translation by Christian Preus includes an introduction that delves in to the history of this important contribution to the Reformation movement, as well as extensive footnotes that explain the people and concepts used by Melanchthon to explain the(…)

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